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Tympanic border cells are Wnt-responsive and can act as progenitors for postnatal mouse cochlear cells

Overview of attention for article published in Development (09501991), January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Tympanic border cells are Wnt-responsive and can act as progenitors for postnatal mouse cochlear cells
Published in
Development (09501991), January 2013
DOI 10.1242/dev.087528
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taha Adnan Jan, Renjie Chai, Zahra Nabi Sayyid, Renée van Amerongen, Anping Xia, Tian Wang, Saku Tapani Sinkkonen, Yi Arial Zeng, Jared Ruben Levin, Stefan Heller, Roel Nusse, Alan Gi-Lun Cheng

Abstract

Permanent hearing loss is caused by the irreversible damage of cochlear sensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cells. In the postnatal cochlea, the sensory epithelium is terminally differentiated, whereas tympanic border cells (TBCs) beneath the sensory epithelium are proliferative. The functions of TBCs are poorly characterized. Using an Axin2(lacZ) Wnt reporter mouse, we found transient but robust Wnt signaling and proliferation in TBCs during the first 3 postnatal weeks, when the number of TBCs decreases. In vivo lineage tracing shows that a subset of hair cells and supporting cells is derived postnatally from Axin2-expressing TBCs. In cochlear explants, Wnt agonists stimulated the proliferation of TBCs, whereas Wnt inhibitors suppressed it. In addition, purified Axin2(lacZ) cells were clonogenic and self-renewing in culture in a Wnt-dependent manner, and were able to differentiate into hair cell-like and supporting cell-like cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Axin2-positive TBCs are Wnt responsive and can act as precursors to sensory epithelial cells in the postnatal cochlea.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 9%
Portugal 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Hungary 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 35 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 26%
Researcher 10 23%
Other 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2013.
All research outputs
#228,688
of 6,230,693 outputs
Outputs from Development (09501991)
#82
of 3,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,541
of 97,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Development (09501991)
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,230,693 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,603 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 97,928 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.